Red Wings Prospect Tournament Number Notes

The Detroit Red Wings announced their roster for the 2017 NHL Prospect Tournament on Friday and we’ve got some returning players who will be changing their jersey numbers.

Summer numbers can be somewhat volatile, so who knows what of these will stick for main camp.

Evgeny Svechnikov, who’s been wearing #37 with the Red Wings, is now shown wearing #77.  This matches the switch that he made with the Grand Rapids Griffins last season.  Dan Renouf had been assigned that number last season and is not appearing in the prospect tournament so we don’t know what change he might be making.

Dominic Turgeon has gone from #78 to #23.  This is somewhat interesting as veteran Brian Lashoff is still with the Red Wings’ organization and that number had been assigned to him.  Turgeon has traditionally worn #23 in honor of his sister.

Filip Hronek and Givani Smith, who wore numbers in the 80s in camp last summer, will wear #24 and #48, respectively.  Griffins captain Nathan Paetsch had worn #24 last year while Ryan Sproul abandoned #48 in his summer switch to #62.

Vili Saarijarvi, who lost his #28 to Luke Witkowski, switches to #29.  That will be his third camp number, having started with #71.

Axel Holmstrom, who had previously (and humorously) worn the #96 that formerly belong to Tomas Holmstrom, is now assigned #49.  Eric Tangradi had been assigned #49 so, like Lashoff, we’ll see if there’s a coming change there.

Dennis Cholowski is wearing #53 after wearing #2 at this summer’s development camp and #95 at last summer’s.  Jordan Sambrook, who had been wearing #95 after Cholowski, switches to #63.

Six 2017 draft picks will be appearing on the Red Wings’ tournament roster, with none of them keeping the numbers that they wore in July.  Michael Rasmussen switches from #37 to #27, taking the number that Joe Hicketts had been assigned.  Combined with Cholowski’s switch, I wonder if Hicketts will be assigned #2 in the main camp.  Lane Zablocki goes from #67 to the #46 worn in camp last year by Ben Street.  Reilly Webb switches from #84 to #50.  Zach Gallant goes from #73 to #64.  Brady Gilmour inverts #76 to #67.  Cole Fraser gets #74 instead of #85.

Thoughts on Reactions to Offsides Review

I didn’t watch any of Game One of the Stanley Cup Finals last night but as I caught up with the news via Twitter this morning, I was completely unsurprised to see the media complaining about offsides review.

P.K. Subban appeared to score a goal for the Nashville Predators but, upon video review, the play was determined to be offsides.  Whether or not that determination was accurate can be debated, as is the case with most close video reviews.

The thing that I find interesting about this is that the cry is almost universally for the NHL to stop reviewing offsides.  That human error is okay every now and then if it leads to more scoring.  Oh, there are some who suggest a different offsides rule – such as one where a player’s skate is allowed to be over the blue line rather than on the ice, which I agree with – but those suggestions seem to be in the minority.

These takes are difficult for me to reconcile with the acceptance of horrible goaltender interference calls against Tomas Holmstrom just ten years ago.

I mean, there were no calls for rule changes based on the goals that were called back in October of 2007 or February of 2008 or May of 2008.

The idea that human error taking goals off the board just had to be accepted, while today we talk about human error putting goals on the board being embraced, is just too much dissonance for me.

I admit that there’s a little bit of an apples-to-oranges comparison here, as, unlike ten years ago, there is now the ability to challenge a goalie interference call in addition to the offsides challenges.  That doesn’t change the fact that so many call for a fix to today’s supposed problem while having remained silent then.

Rosters for Red Wings – Maple Leafs Centennial Classic Alumni Game Announced

The rosters for the Centennial Classic Alumni Game were announced on Tuesday, as tickets for the game went on sale.

The Toronto Maple Leafs alumni team will host the Detroit Red Wings alumni at BMO Field on December 31, a day before the Leafs host the Wings in the Centennial Classic.

The rosters are as follows:

Detroit Red Wings

Name Pos.
Kris Draper F
Dino Ciccarelli F
Martin Lapointe F
Doug Brown F
Sergei Fedorov F
Vyacheslav Kozlov F
Brendan Shanahan F
Tomas Holmstrom F
Mickey Redmond F
Darren McCarty F
Igor Larionov F
Kirk Maltby F
Joe Kocur F
Nicklas Lidstrom D
Larry Murphy D
Chris Chelios D
Jiri Fischer D
Paul Coffey D
Manny Legace G
Kevin Hodson G

Toronto Maple Leafs

Name Pos.
Darryl Sittler F
Doug Gilmour F
Rick Vaive F
Darcy Tucker F
Wendel Clark F
Lanny McDonald F
Gary Roberts F
Dave Andreychuk F
Tiger Williams F
Tie Domi F
Steve Thomas F
Gary Leeman F
Mats Sundin F
Tomas Kaberle D
Dave Ellett D
Bryan McCabe D
Borje Salming D
Dmitri Yushkevich D
Al Iafrate D
Bob McGill D
Curtis Joseph G
Felix Potvin G
Mike Palmateer G

Every player from the Detroit roster played in one of the two Alumni Showdown games at Comerica Park in 2013.  Lapointe, Fischer, Dandenault, and Hodson played in the first game while the rest played in the second game, which mostly featured the bigger names.

Former Red Wings who appeared in that second game but won’t be in Toronto include Steve Yzerman, Chris Osgood, Viacheslav Fetisov, and Mark Howe.  Of those, only Yzerman played at the Stadium Series Alumni Game in Denver last February.

On the Red Wings’ Next Alternate Captain

With Pavel Datsyuk having departed, the Red Wings are left with an open spot among their contingent of captains.  I brought this up on Twitter a month ago and WiiM did a post on it a couple weeks ago.  I went back through the team’s recent history to see if anything can be gleaned from it to show us who might be picked.

The 2015-16 season was unique for the Red Wings in that captain Henrik Zetterberg and alternates Datsyuk and Niklas Kronwall were the only players to wear letters for the team all year.  That doesn’t mean there wasn’t opportunity – both Datsyuk and Kronwall missed significant time due to injury – it means that there were 34 games where Detroit didn’t even bother sewing an “A” on anyone else’s sweater.

Captains are the only players who can speak to on-ice officials but the Red Wings’ going with fewer than the allowed number of captains shows how unimportant that rule.  Of note: Teams may have no more than three lettered players on the roster but there is nothing saying that they have to have that number.

We have to go back to the 2015 season to find replacement captains used by the Red Wings.  Despite ten games with only two captains dressed, seven players still managed to wear a letter throughout the year.  The injured Johan Franzen wore it for ten games, Jonathan Ericsson and Daniel Cleary each wore it for three, and Darren Helm wore it for one.

If he were healthy, I think Franzen would get the A, but he’ll never play again.  Cleary may very well return to the organization and get a letter in Grand Rapids, but I think he can be ruled out in Detroit.  That leaves Ericsson and the recently-re-signed Helm.

Going back one more season to 2014 adds no new names to the list, as the now-retired Daniel Alfredsson was the most-frequent extra alternate, wearing an A for 36 games to Franzen’s 31 and Cleary’s 8.  Five games were spent with only two captains.

The lockout-shortened 2013 – Zetterberg’s first as captain – featured three games with only two captains but no replacement alternates.  It was also the first season since the 2007-08 campaign, when Datsyuk was given an A along with Zetterberg and Kris Draper, that the team had only three captains.

Even with four captains on the books in 2012, Tomas Holmstrom wore the A for eight games.  The team dressed three captains for every game.

Going back further, we see the names of long-departed defensemen Brian Rafalski and Chris Chelios…  Clearly players who won’t be options now.

In the last seven years there have been ten players to wear the C or A with the Red Wings.  Two of them – Zetterberg and Kronwall – still do.  Only two of the remaining eight are still with the team: Ericsson and Helm.

At three games to one, Ericsson has more experience wearing the letter than Helm.  Maybe that gives him an edge.

So can anything be pulled from these numbers?  I think the only thing they show is that it’s time for someone new.  The old standbys are gone.

While newcomers Frans Nielsen, Thomas Vanek, and Steve Ott have all worn letters elsewhere in their career – Nielsen had an A with the Islanders last season while Vanek and Ott co-captained the Sabres back in the 2013-14 season – the Red Wings haven’t given the alternate captaincy directly to a newcomer since trading for Brendan Shanahan in 1996.

By my count, the Wings haven’t had two defenseman with letters since before the Steve Yzerman era, which would seemingly rule out Ericsson or any of the other blueliners, so long as Kronwall wears the A.

Jeff Blashill is not Jacques Demers.  I don’t think Dylan Larkin gets the available letter by virtue of being the team’s best player.

I think – almost from lack of better options – that we’ll see Justin Abdelkader get the A.

Of course, that could change if the mythical “trade for a top defenseman” ever emerges.  We’ll see.

On Goalie Interference

I ranted on Twitter a bit during the Red Wings’ eventually-unsuccessful challenge of the Penguins’ first goal of the game.

It may seem a little disingenuous to compare modern goalie interference calls to those levied against a player who retired three years ago. Rules have changed since then. Video review of Holmstrom’s goalie interference calls was never an option.

The reason I do it, though, is because – while we now have video review – the actual definition of goalie interference has not changed. Which means that, in theory, plays now should be held to the same standard that Holmstrom was during his career.

We saw Detroit goals disallowed because Holmstrom was hovering over the crease, not making contact with the goaltender. Plays where the refs went to center ice and announced that a goal was coming back because a player was in the crease. We saw that multiple times a season and no one in the league offices or the media even blinked, despite that not being the rule.

Tonight we saw a skater planted in the crease, seemingly pushing the goalie around in it, and we debate whether that contact really made a difference. No one suggests that his mere presence in the blue paint should negate the goal. Even with video review to get the call right, the call that was made against Holmstrom never gets made now.

So I rant because it’s an implicit admission that all those calls throughout his career were wrong. If the standards are the same, and video review allows us to get it right, and someone standing in the crease and pushing the goalie around is a legal play, then Tomas Holmstrom‘s entire reputation for committing goalie interference was fabricated. I want to force people to see – and maybe acknowledge – that.

Red Wings’ 2014 Development Camp Sweater Number Stuff

I write about possible sweater number changes every summer and with Monday’s release of the Red Wings’ 2014 Development Camp roster, we’ve got the first opportunity to take a look at some possibilities.

As always, the official disclaimer from Detroit is that these numbers mean nothing. As I always say, however, history doesn’t show that. Usually if a number is assigned to a player in camp, it won’t be worn by a roster player in the coming season.

Last year was the first year since I’ve been tracking that players in development camp were assigned numbers already worn by roster players, as Petr Mrazek‘s #34 went to free agent try-out Andrew D’Agostini. Tomas Tatar‘s #21 was given to Luke Glendening but there is evidence that Tatar was going to switch to #90 before Stephen Weiss got it. Phillippe Hudon getting the #63 previously worn by Joakim Andersson was the first sign of Andersson taking #18.

This year we have no obvious changes as all of the players wearing numbers that were taken last season have the numbers that belonged to departing free agents.

There are some oddities and humorous assignments, though.

For the first time I can remember, numbers in the 90s are in use. One of those is Axel Holmstrom being assigned the #96 formerly worn by the unrelated Tomas Holmstrom. Similarly, returning camp invitee Dean Chelios wears the #24 previously worn by his father, Chris Chelios. Dominic Turgeon will don a number one higher than that of his dad, Pierre Turgeon, having been assigned #78. The team missed out on one more such opportunity, as Tyler Bertuzzi keeps his #59 rather than taking his uncle’s #44, with Todd Bertuzzi now out of the Red Wings’ plans.

For the record, I expect the #44 to go to Colin Campbell in the main camp.

Only one returning player who isn’t a free agent tryout is changing his number from last season, as David Pope drops down from #64 to the #63 vacated by Hudon.

Numbers for players making their first appearance at development camp are as follows (again, with free agents excluded):

Player Name Number
Christoffer Ehn 92
Axel Holmstrom 96
Dylan Larkin 25
Ben Marshall 51
Mike McKee 58
Dominic Turgeon 78
Julius Vahatalo 94

Larkin takes the #25 vacated by Cory Emmerton, Marshall gets the #51 assigned in training camp to Brennan Evans last year, and Mike McKee gets the #58 previously assigned to Max Nicastro, who was not giving a qualifying contract offer by Detroit.

Red Wings Select Six on Second Day of Draft

Following their selection of Michigan native Dylan Larkin in the first round of the 2014 NHL Entry Draft, the Detroit Red Wings picked an additional six players in the remaining rounds on Saturday.

The Red Wings missed out on the second round, having sent that draft pick to the Nashville Predators in the David Legwand trade in March. To help make up for it, they moved up in the third round, sending their original third-rounder (76th overall) and a third-rounder in 2015 to the Columbus Blue Jackets for the 63rd overall pick, which they used to select Dominic Turgeon.

Turgeon, the 18-year-old son of former NHL star Pierre Turgeon, is a two-way center who scored ten goals and added 21 assists in 65 games for the Portland Winterhawks of the WHL in 2013-14.

At 106th overall in the fourth round, Detroit went with another center, Christopher Ehn of Froluna Juniors in Sweden. The 6’2″ 18-year-old scored four goals and seven assists in 45 games 2013-14.

The Red Wings turned to a goalie in the fifth round, selecting Thomas “Chase” Perry of the NAHL’s Wenatchee Wild. Perry, 18, had a 2.34 goals-against average and a .905 save percentage in 35 games last season. The Andover, MD, native is commited to play for Colorado College next season.

In the ninth round Detroit selected 19-year-old winger Julius Vahatalo of TPS in Finland. Vahatalo is 6’5″ but only 191 pounds and had previously been passed over in the 2013 NHL Entry Draft. He had 18 goals and 21 assists in 33 games for the junior TPS squad, adding three goals in 18 games for the main club.

Two seventh-round selections closed out the draft for Detroit.

At 186th overall, the team selected Swedish center Axel Holmstrom. Holmstrom – who is not related to former Red Wing Tomas Holmstrom – had 15 goals and 23 assists in 33 games for Skelleftea. He turns 18 on Sunday.

At 201st overall the Red Wings went with center Alexander Kadeykin of Russia. Kadeykin, 20, went unselected in both 2012 and 2013. He scored eight goals and fifteen assists in 54 games for the KHL’s Atlant Mytishchi.

Alumni Showdown Roster Review

I’ve been (finally) going through my photos from the Alumni Showdown at Comerica Park on New Years Eve and my lack of familiarity with some of the Toronto players has been causing some problems. I look at my photos and say “Who is that guy and why don’t I see a #28 listed on the roster?”

Well, it’s because the announced rosters weren’t the final rosters. A couple players were listed for one game and played in the other or were listed with different numbers or were listed and didn’t actually play. I went back through the player introductions to put together a complete list and I figured I’d share it out for posterity.

Game One

Toronto Maple Leafs

# Name Pos.
33 Doug Favell G
1 Mark Laforest G
1 Peter Ing G
4 Mike Pelyk D
4 Cory Cross D
33 Matt Martin D
3 Brad Marsh (A) D
4 Greg Hotham D
24 Dan Daoust F
21 Mark Osborne F
19 Bill Derlago F
9 Stew Gavin F
15 Pat Boutette F
12 Rob Pearson F
15 Claude Loiselle F
10 Brad May (A) F
14 Dave Reid F
19 Tom Fergus (A) F
26 Mike Krushelnyski F
7 Dave McLlwain F
8 Todd Warriner F
20 Mike Johnson F
16 Nikolai Borschevsky F
32 Lou Franceschetti F

On the Toronto side, Doug Favell wasn’t listed on the roster but did play. Jamie Macoun and Shayne Corson were listed but didn’t play. Mike Johnson wore #20 after being listed without a number.

For Detroit, Ken Holland was on the roster but did not play.

Game Two

Toronto Maple Leafs

# Name Pos.
29 Mike Palmateer G
31 Curtis Joseph G
29 Felix Potvin G
24 Bryan McCabe (A) D
34 Jamie Macoun D
4 Dave Ellett D
15 Bob McGill D
33 Al Iafrate D
34 Bryan Berard D
27 Darryl Sittler (C) F
22 Rick Vaive (C) F
17 Wendel Clark (C) F
93 Doug Gilmour (C) F
14 Dave Andreychuk (A) F
16 Darcy Tucker (A) F
18 Kevin Maguire F
4 Gary Leeman (A) F
9 Russ Courtnall F
7 Gary Roberts (A) F
7 Lanny McDonald (A) F
22 Tiger Williams F
16 Mike Walton F
28 Tie Domi (A) F
11 Mike Gartner F
25 Joe Nieuwendyk (A) F
32 Steve Thomas (A) F
11 Steve Sullivan F

For Detroit, the only oddity was that Joe Kocur was introduced in and played the first period wearing Bob Probert‘s #24 jersey.

For the Leafs, several things were different. Macoun played after having been on the Game One roster. Curtis Joseph wore his usual #31 and Felix Potvin wore #29, having been listed with #35 and #36, respectively. Bryan McCabe wore #24 instead of #29. Up front, Gary Leeman wore #4 instead of #11, Tie Domi wore #28 instead of #20, and Mike Gartner wore #11 instead of #22.

As I said, compiling this list is nothing groundbreaking, I just wanted it to be documented somewhere so I figured I’d write it up.

Alumni Showdown Rosters

Possibly lost in the shuffle yesterday between the Griffins/Marlies tilt at Comerica Park, the Red Wings’ visit to Nashville, and other build-up to tomorrow’s Winter Classic in Ann Arbor, Bill Roose had the rosters for Detroit’s two alumni teams for today’s Alumni Showdown.

Kocur was listed as wearing his usual #26 but announced that he would don #24 in honor of Bob Probert.

On the Kane Goal and Shaw Interference

Not surprisingly, there’s already been a lot of talk about Patrick Kane‘s goal (or, more precisely, the uncalled penalty immediately prior to it) and the apparent Chicago goal immediately following it that was called back due to goalie interference.

We’ve seen the “Two wrongs make a right” theory (a penalty should have been called which would have negated Kane’s goal so the wrong call was made on the Shaw interference to make up for it), the “Holmstrom Interpretation” (what Shaw did was cause for many negated goals when Tomas Holmstrom did it) and the “What if a Blackhawk had been boarded and a Wings’ goal disallowed” scenario.

I hate the idea of make-up calls. I wouldn’t be surprised if that’s what happened here but they’ll never admit it, especially since they can hide behind the Holmstrom Interpretation if they want.

I also can’t get behind the idea that changing something later to make up for something that happens earlier actually makes up for it, as we have no idea how things would have played out if the first call had been made differently. Maybe the Red Wings would have scored on their power play rather than Kane scoring and it would have been a drastically different 3-0 game. We’ll never know.

I want to run with the “what if” scenario, though, and give it a different twist. What if the disallowed goal had come first?

It seems to me that disallowing what would have been a second goal to make up for the first being allowed when it shouldn’t have (what we may have seen unfold tonight) causes much more of an uproar than the reverse. If a ‘Hawks goal had been called back on a weak goalie interference claim and then Chicago scored on a play where a penalty should have been called, I just get the feeling that it would have been seen as more “correct” than what actually happened, even though the result (as far as the score goes) is the same.

Or maybe that’s just late-night rambling from me. I don’t know.