Red Wings Add Defenseman Zidlicky

The Detroit Red Wings acquired defenseman Marek Zidlicky from the New Jersey Devils in the final hours before the NHL’s trade deadline on Monday.

Zidlicky waived a no-movement clause to accept the trade to Detroit. The Devils received a third-round draft pick in 2016 in return. If the Red Wings make the Stanley Cup Final, they will also get Detroit’s second-round draft pick this year.

The Devils retained $1 million in salary on Zidlicky’s contract, which expires this summer.

In 63 games with the Devils, Zidlicky has four goals and 19 assists.

It was the second trade in the final 24 hours before the trade deadline for Detroit, as the Red Wings acquired forward Erik Cole from the Dallas Stars on Sunday night.

Ericsson to Return Tonight

For the first time in quite awhile, the Red Wings will be facing a team with more players out to injury than Detroit has as they host the Carolina Hurricanes tonight.

The Red Wings will get Jonathan Ericsson back into the lineup, with Doug Janik being sent back to Grand Rapids.

This gives Detroit only five injuries – Andreas Lilja, Johan Franzen, Jason Williams, Niklas Kronwall and Tomas Holmstrom.

The Hurricanes, meanwhile, have six regulars out of the lineup – Chad Larose, Scott Walker, Joe Corvo, Sergei Samsonov, Tuomo Ruutu and Erik Cole.

Jimmy Howard gets the start in net for the Wings, likely going up against Carolina’s Cam Ward as former Red Wing Manny Legace is not expected to start.

Red Wings’ Streak Reaches Six with Win over Hurricanes

The Detroit Red Wings extended their winning streak to six games Sunday night, earning a 5-2 victory over the visiting Carolina Hurricanes.

Carolina’s loss stretches their regular season winless streak at Joe Louis Arena to thirteen games. The Hurricanes earned a victory in Detroit in the first game of the 2002 Stanley Cup Finals but haven’t picked up two points in Michigan since November 14, 1989, when the team was still the Hartford Whalers.

The Red Wings had three one-goal leads on the night, with the Hurricanes bouncing back to tie twice.

Valtteri Filppula got Detroit on the board at 4:35 of the first period. Filppula broke in on Carolina netminder Cam Ward from the right wing and almost beat him, putting the puck under his pad. Mikael Samuelsson crashed the net, poking at the puck but not before Ward had pulled his pad – puck included – across the goal line.

Erik Cole scored the first of his two goals just 46 seconds into the second period, tying things back up. His first shot from the side of the net was stopped by Detroit goalie Dominik Hasek but Cole swatted the rebound out of mid-air, over the falling Hasek.

A power play goal at 6:02 of the period put the Wings back out in front. Tic-tac-toe passing on the right side of the ice moved the puck from Dan Cleary to Niklas Kronwall to Jiri Hudler and back to Cleary for a quick shot on net. At the top of the crease, Johan Franzen tipped it past Ward.

Carolina evened things up on a power play of their own 4:34 later. Cole scored his second goal of the night, scoring from the right wing when his shot on net deflected off the stick of Detroit’s Brian Rafalski.

Andreas Lilja scored a rare goal with 7:20 remaining in the middle frame, giving the Red Wings another lead on a rocket shot from inside the blue line.

Detroit would make that lead hold.

With 2:38 remaining in regulation, Pavel Datsyuk added an insurance marker. Datsyuk stole the puck from Eric Staal at the Carolina blue line and broke in alone on Ward. Cutting from his right to left, Datsyuk faked out Ward and lifted a shot over him.

Tomas Holmstrom wrapped up the game’s scoring 36 seconds later. Henrik Zetterberg broke into the Hurricanes’ zone, catching Ward on his way to the bench for an extra attacker. Ward made it back into the crease to stop Zetterberg’s shot but was out of position on Holmstrom’s rebound chance.

Each team scored one power play goal. Detroit had seven chances with the extra attacker while Carolina had five.

Hasek stopped 15 of 17 shots to earn his third-straight win after backing up Chris Osgood for six of seven games. Ward made 33 saves on 38 shots against.

The Red Wings return to action on Monday in Nashville, with Osgood getting the start in net.

Americans Advance as Latvia Loses

Team USA, which completed the Olympic round-robin with only one win, advanced to the Quarterfinals on Tuesday when Kazakhstan defeated Latvia. With their berth in the next round already determined, the Americans then went on to lose to Russia, 5-4.

After dropping twin 2-1 games to Slovakia and Sweden over the weekend, the United States looked to find it’s offence against the Russians. They succeeded, but goalie Robert Esche (Philadelphia Flyers) and the U.S. blue line couldn’t match the team’s performance with Rick DiPietro (New York Islanders) in the net over the weekend, allowing more goals to Russia than they did to the Slovaks and Swedes combined.

Alexei Kovalev (Montreal Canadiens) scored the game-winner late in the game, with other Russian goals coming from Alexander Korolyuk (San Jose Sharks), Evgeni Malkin, Alexander Ovechkin (Washington Capitals), and Andrei Markov (Canadiens).

The American goals came from Brian Rolston (Minnesota Wild), Brian Gionta (New Jersey Devils), Scott Gomez (Devils), and Erik Cole (Carolina Hurricanes).

Team USA will play top-seeded Finland in the Quarterfinals on Wednesday.

Detroit Comeback Falls Short in Loss to Carolina

A flurry of shots during a last-minute power play wasn’t enough for the Detroit Red Wings Tuesday night, failing to score a tying goal and falling to the Carolina Hurricanes, 3-2.

Detroit had allowed the game’s first three goals before scoring the next two to pull within one.

Matt Cullen scored the game’s opening goal at 5:45 of the first. After a Detroit turnover in the neutral zone, Cullen carried the puck into the Red Wings’ zone before defenseman Brett Lebda dropped to the ice to block a possible shot. Cullen outwaited Lebda and stepped around him before wristing a shot past Detroit goalie Manny Legace.

Just 3:36 later, the Hurricanes went up by two with a power play goal. A backhand shot from the right circle by Bret Hedican deflected at the top of the crease to former Red Wing Ray Whitney at the far side of the goal. Whitney banged it in on his second attempt.

With 5:52 left in the period, Erik Cole scored Carolina’s third goal. Cole broke in on goal from the right circle and Legace came out to make the stop. Cole got the rebound and moved to go behind the net as Legace attempted to poke check him. Legace never recovered from the poke check and Cole retained the puck for an open wraparound.

The Red Wings would shut the Hurricanes down for the remainder of the game but the damage was already done.

Steve Yzerman showed that he’s not out of tricks yet, beginning Detroit’s comeback attempt just 1:59 after Cole’s goal.

Yzerman carried the puck on his own through the neutral zone and into Carolina’s end, cutting through the high slot and into the right circle past a pair of defenders. He moved back into the slot to get around Hurricanes’ goalie Martin Gerber and caught him sideways, lifting the puck over his outstretched pad.

Detroit pulled within one at 3:26 of the second period when Henrik Zetterberg scored a fluke power play goal. Zetterberg attempted a pass from the side of the net that deflected off former Red Wing Aaron Ward at the edge of the crease and past Gerber.

Detroit outshot Carolina 19-6 in the third period but the Red Wings could not even the score.

Legace finished the game with 22 saves on 25 shots as Gerber stopped 36 of 36 attempts in net for Carolina.

The Red Wings went one-for-six on the power play and allowed one Carolina power play goal on four chances.

Detroit will be back in action on Thursday when the Philadelphia Flyers visit Joe Louis Arena.

Two Red Wings Named U.S. Olympians

Detroit Red Wings defensemen Chris Chelios and Mathieu Schneider were two of the 23 players named to the United States’ mens ice hockey rosrer for the upcoming Winter Olympics in Torino, Italy. The roster for the team was announced on Monday.

Chelios, along with Keith Tkachuk of the St. Louis Blues, will be making his fourth trip to the Olympics. He was previously named to Team USA in 1984, 1998 and 2002, as well as for the World Cup of Hockey in 1996 and 2004.

“There’s no doubt the intangibles Chris Chelios brings to any team have to be discussed,” said Wings general manager Ken Holland. “We brought him back for his ability to play, but also because of his leadership and competitiveness. When he’s on your team, he believes your team is going to win, and he has an impact on the players around him.”

“I feel very lucky at my age and am looking forward to the challenge,” said Chelios, who will turn 44 in January.

Schneider, seemingly a lock for the team after his strong play in the 2003-04 season and early this year, will be making his second Olympic appearance for the United States. He was named to Team USA for the 1998 Olympics in Nagano, Japan, but did not make the team in 2002. He also played for Team USA at the World Cup in 1996 and 2004.

“With his ability to skate and handle the puck… the way he played two years ago and this year, it became pretty obvious that he had to be on the team,” Holland said.

“We think our depth on defense is as good as it’s ever been,” Team USA general manager Don Waddell said.

Almost half of the team has ties to Michigan, either having come from the state, played for the Red Wings, or played for one of the area’s college teams.

The full roster is as follows:

Goaltenders (3)
Rick DiPietro
Robert Esche
John Grahame

Defensemen (7)
Chris Chelios
Derian Hatcher
Jordan Leopold
John-Michael Liles
Aaron Miller
Brian Rafalski
Mathieu Schneider

Forwards (13)
Jason Blake
Erik Cole
Craig Conroy
Chris Drury
Brian Gionta
Scott Gomez
Bill Guerin
Mike Knuble
Mike Modano
Mark Parrish
Brian Rolston
Keith Tkachuk
Doug Weight

Penalties Tell the Game Story

The one and only matchup this season between last year’s Stanley Cup finalists should have been an intense, entertaining game. Instead, it became an overload of penalties. The Carolina Hurricanes scored on five of a ludicrous nine power plays they were given, and in spite of the Red Wings’ best efforts to score during their rare times at even strength or with the man advantage, they still wound up on the losing end of a 6-4 game.

Detroit scored twice in the first period, both times in four-on-four play. First Brett Hull waited patiently in the high slot, as he does. When Nick Lidstrom sent a well placed pass across from the right side, Hull sent a one-time shot soaring into the net past goalie Kevin Weekes. The second goal came from Kirk Maltby, who crossed the blue line with the puck and wristed a shot past the partially screened goaltender.

Weekes was injured shortly after Maltby’s goal, while the Wings were attempting to score shorthanded. Maltby shoved Bret Hedican towards the net after the play stopped. Hedican fell on top of Weekes, who hit his head. Weekes was helped off the ice and Arturs Irbe came out to take his place.

Pavel Datsyuk was also injured in the first period. He was shoved and fell into Sean Hill. It seemed at first as if he had hit his head, but team personnel later reported that Datsyuk had actually hurt his knee and would need to go for further testing.

The second period saw the Hurricanes come back to tie and take the lead, with one power play goal after another. Jan Hlavac was able to score by tapping the rebound from a Bates Battaglia shot in past Curtis Joseph. A few minutes later, David Tanabe scored the equalizer with a hard shot from the blue line. Igor Larionov dropped to block the shot, but the shot was high enough to glance off the top of his skate and fly past Joseph into the net. Hlavac scored again to take the lead, this time on a tidy passing play. Erik Cole sent a pass from the left boards to Battaglia at the right side of the net, and Battaglia put it out front for Hlavac to whack in for the goal.

Henrik Zetterberg scored just before the period was over, tying the game back up. Tomas Holmstrom made a play to Luc Robitaille, who left a saucer pass for Zetterberg. The rookie made a move around Hill and put the puck in on Irbe’s far side.

Carolina’s fourth power play goal was Hlavac’s third of the game. He waited in front of the net, got a rebound from Rod Brind’amour’s shot, and put it high past Lidstrom and Joseph both.

Hull tied the game again when the Red Wings got the best break they had all night. Penalties to Glen Wesley and to Cole resulted in a 5-on-3 power play, and the Detroit power play used the opportunity to show off its best passing skills. Igor Larionov sent the puck from the right side of the net down to Lidstrom at the right point, and Lidstrom sent the puck across to Hull. Hull’s hard one-time shot flew into the net before Irbe even had a chance to see it.

Unfortunately, a questionable hooking call against Chris Chelios (he lifted the stick of Sami Kapanen to keep him from shooting the puck, and Kapanen’s feet somehow just flew out from under him) gave the Hurricanes the chance to get their fifth power play goal and take the lead for good. Brind’amour’s shot went off the skate of Mathieu Dandenault, and the rebound came out to Jeff O’Neill, who was able to slap it past Joseph.

Carolina actually did manage to score an even strength goal. Kapanen received the puck from Ron Francis. He turned with it and fired. Joseph was partially screened, and the puck just glanced off the top of his catching glove.

Detroit took a total of 28 shots on net. Carolina, aided by their power plays, had 41.

The Red Wings’ next game will be Sunday night at home against the Calgary Flames.


Brett Hull is now on an eight-game point streak, and just 12 goals away from the 700th of his career…. Associate coach Barry Smith said that Pavel Datsyuk’s knee had been “wrenched,” and information about the extent of the injury would be given as it became available.

BELIEVE, One More Time

It was June 13, 2002, about 11:00 pm in Detroit. A buzzer sounded inside Joe Louis Arena, barely audible over the screaming of 20,058 fans. Players in white jerseys streamed onto the ice, hugging, laughing, some of them barely able to believe they’d finally reached their ultimate goal. All over Metro Detroit, in sports bars in Royal Oak, apartments Downriver, parties downtown, whoops of joy and celebration echoed out into the cool early summer night. For the first time ever, Dominik Hasek, Luc Robitaille, Freddy Olausson, and Steve Duchesne, deserving veterans all, hoisted Lord Stanley’s Cup above their heads. And a few moments later, Sergei Fedorov brought the Cup to fallen defenseman Vladimir Konstantinov and helped him lift it above his head, one more time.

The Game Five victory against the Carolina Hurricanes did not come easily. As ever, the Hurricanes played their defensive trap and played it well. Matters were compounded for the Red Wings by the NHL suspension of Jiri Fischer for a hard cross-check laid on Tommy Westlund in Game Four. Trade deadline acquisition Jiri Slegr was brought in to fill the spot on the blue line, in spite of the fact that he had not played a game since the regular season. Slegr was ready, however. “Everybody’s dream is the Stanley Cup, and here I’m playing in it right now,” he said.

The first period was scoreless, although the Grind Line created some scoring chances, and Luc Robitaille rang a strong shot off the goalpost. Sergei Fedorov got in all alone on a breakaway, but his shot thudded into the chest of goaltender Arturs Irbe.

The Red Wings opened the scoring early in the second period. Series star Igor Larionov made a centering pass from the right corner behind the Carolina net, and Tomas Holmstrom lunged forward to poke it in for the goal. He was being shoved down at the time, and as he landed flat on his back against the boards behind the net, Holmstrom raised his arms in celebration.

The Hurricanes had a chance to tie the game when Jiri Slegr was given a penalty for holding up big Erik Cole along the boards, but Dominik Hasek made a phenomenal save, screened on a redirected shot, and the Red Wings kept the lead.

The Wings gained a goal cushion, and the eventual game winning goal, on a power play of their own. Jaroslav Svoboda was in the penalty box for roughing, and Steve Yzerman fired a shot on net. The puck flew high, but Fedorov found it behind the net and passed it out front to Brendan Shanahan, who one-timed it past Irbe.

The Hurricanes scored their only goal of the game late in the period, on the tail end of a shortened penalty on Shanahan. Jeff O’Neill took a hard shot from a bad angle on the left wing side. Hasek was screened by Cole, and did not see the shot until it was too late. The shot was so hard and the puck was in and out of the net so quickly that the officials had to review it to make sure it had actually gone into the net.

Play in the third period went end to end, staying mainly in the neutral zone. Carolina played frantically, trying desperately to create needed scoring chances, but the chances would not come. Finally, with just a minute left to play, they pulled their goaltender in exchange for a sixth skater, but Shanahan got the puck from Yzerman, skated it to just outside the Hurricanes’ blue line, and fired a laser shot which landed solidly in the empty net to clinch the Red Wings’ third Stanley Cup in six years. The players wound down the remaining forty seconds or so. The buzzer sounded, and the celebration began. And Jiri Fischer was the first one to jump off the bench and join his teammates on the ice. In front of the net, Hasek jumped up and down like an excited child. “It’s a fantastic feeling, and I’m so happy!” he said.

NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman presented the awards. The Conn Smythe Trophy for the most valuable player in the playoffs went to the highly deserving Nicklas Lidstrom. And then the Stanley Cup itself, to Steve Yzerman, who took his little daughter Isabella with him to accept the award for the team.

In the middle of the revelry, Scotty Bowman dropped the revelation he’d been holding onto: “This is my last game as a coach.” He had made the decision during the Olympic Break in February, that regardless of this season’s outcome, it was the right time to retire. On top of his coaching game, having broken another of his mentor Toe Blake’s records by winning a ninth Stanley Cup, and ready to go, the winningest coach of all time.

Most of the players have indicated that they wish to return for another season. Chris Chelios and Brett Hull are especially eager to keep their skates for another year. Steve Yzerman, once he recovers from the much needed surgery on his right knee, will return to lead the team again. Dominik Hasek has not yet made a decision. The outcome of the 2002 off-season decisions will be known, eventually.

The outcome of the 2001 off-season decisions was realized tonight, as the Stanley Cup returned home to Hockeytown.

Detroit Leads Series 3-1

When a hockey writer can lead off with a glorious headline like that, why waste time trying to think up something clever? The Red Wings are starting to make up for lost time, scoring the goals that couldn’t get through the Hurricanes’ defensive trap before, and giving Carolina a taste of their own medicine by shutting them down to win Game Four 3-0 and bring a commanding 3-1 series lead home to Detroit.

The first period started just as it had in the three preceding games: tight checking and low in scoring chances. The Red Wings did have an early power play, but Carolina’s penalty killers were in fine form and did not allow the Wings to set up a scoring chance. Hurricanes goaltender Arturs Irbe was tested by only four quality chances in the first twenty minutes, while Dominik Hasek at the other end of the rink had to deal with only three good Carolina scoring chances. The most notable of these happened just as the period was drawing to an end. Rookie Erik Cole dodged around Chris Chelios to go into the zone all by himself, but Hasek came way out of the net and dove towards Cole’s skates, stick outstretched, and took the puck away.

The Red Wings finally managed to open the scoring early in the third period. Freddy Olausson got around a Carolina defender and got the puck to Boyd Devereaux at the blue line. Devereaux squeezed past another defender and carried the puck up the right side, looking as if to shoot the whole way up, but instead he threaded a pass through to Brett Hull coming up the left wing side. Hull dropped to one knee and one-timed the shot off the goalpost and into the net.

The Red Wings dominated most of the game after that. Carolina’s best scoring chance came during a phantom high-sticking penalty to Luc Robitaille. Ron Francis had Hasek beaten, but his shot clanged off the post.

Igor Larionov added an insurance goal early in the third period. Tomas Holmstrom got the puck over to the left side boards in Carolina’s zone, then tied up the Carolina player going after it. Jiri Fischer took a few steps forward from the blue line to get to it. Fischer faked a shot, but instead passed to Larionov just at the right side of the net, uncovered. Larionov held the puck just long enough for everyone to realize what he was going to do, but not long enough that anyone could do anything about it, before flipping it into Irbe’s unguarded net.

Detroit really shut down the Hurricanes after that, lining up and preventing the puck from getting into their zone under Hurricane control. It was basically a game of keep-away, doing to Carolina what they have done to all the other teams in the playoffs. The Red Wings brought one final goal with 5:17 remaining to put the game away for good. Sergei Fedorov brought the puck across the blue line, with Brendan Shanahan following and heading for the net. Fedorov deked past Sean Hill and passed the puck between Hill’s legs, past Marek Malik, and to the outstretched stick of Shanahan. Shanahan made short work of that one, tipping the puck past Irbe for the goal.

Once again, the Red Wings outshot the Hurricanes, this time by a count of twenty-seven to seventeen. Game Five of the Stanley Cup Finals will be Thursday evening back at Joe Louis Arena.


Brett Hull’s goal was his 100th career playoff goal. He is the fourth leading playoff goal scorer of all time, surpassed only by Wayne Gretzky, Mark Messier, and Jari Kurri…. Igor Larionov broke his own record set in Game Three. He is still the oldest player to have scored in a Stanley Cup Final, just two days older now….. Dominik Hasek also broke his own record, set in Game Seven of the Western Conference Finals, with his sixth playoff shutout this year…. Finally, Scotty Bowman broke legendary coach Toe Blake’s record by winning his 35th Stanley Cup Finals game.

“Old and Tired”? Whatever!

It was the third longest game ever played in the Stanley Cup Finals. It was the longest game yet in the 2002 playoffs. And it was finally won by the oldest player ever to score a goal in the Stanley Cup Finals. Igor Larionov played the hero to give the Red Wings a 3-2 victory in triple overtime and a 2-1 lead in the series.

The first period had good pressure early by Carolina, but then the Red Wings got two power plays right in a row. They were unable to convert, but they were able to take control of the game. As momentum from the power plays waned, Carolina was able to increase the pressure again, and Josef Vasicek opened the scoring with just over five minutes to go in the opening period. Detroit failed to clear the puck from their zone, and Vasicek picked it up in the circle, eluded Steve Duchesne, and wristed a shot high over Dominik Hasek‘s blocker.

The Red Wings answered early in the second period. Kirk Maltby and Aaron Ward were both in the penalty box for unsportsmanlike conduct, creating a four-on-four situation. Brett Hull beat Glen Wesley to pick up an errant Carolina pass in the Hurricanes’ zone, and passed neatly to Igor Larionov at the bottom of the left circle. Larionov one-timed the shot over the shoulder of Arturs Irbe.

Jeff O’Neill regained the lead for the Hurricanes 7:34 into the third period. He slipped in behind Freddy Olausson and got a pass from Ron Francis. O’Neill’s shot rose high and fluttered over Hasek’s glove into the net. The Hurricanes closed down after that, willing to keep a one-goal lead and unwilling to take any risks that could turn into mistakes. They held onto their lead for a long, long time. Detroit got some shots on net, but they weren’t allowed any quality ones, and Irbe was quick to stifle any rebounds.

Finally, with just over a minute to play, the crowd in Raleigh was screaming for their team, ready to celebrate a victory and a series lead. The crowd back in Detroit watching the game on the big screen at Joe Louis Arena was ready to pack up their octopi and go home to regroup for Game Four. That was when Nick Lidstrom and Brett Hull got the job done. Carolina iced the puck, giving the Red Wings a faceoff in the Hurricanes’ end. Larionov won the draw cleanly to Lidstrom, who fired hard. Hull redirected the puck in midair, and it soared into Irbe’s net.

The first overtime saw an amazing number of scoring chances for Detroit. Sergei Fedorov and Brendan Shanahan got away on a glorious two-on-one rush, but Shanahan’s shot clanged off the goalpost. Olausson had a clear shot from the right point to the net, but the puck flew off the crossbar. Pavel Datsyuk completely fooled two Carolina defensmen and went right up to the net, but his backhand shot couldn’t lift quite high enough to beat Irbe.

Carolina tried to bring some pressure in the second overtime, but they were no match for Hasek and his acrobatic saves. Finally, past the halfway point of the third overtime, the Red Wings got the break they were able to capitalize on. Erik Cole left his post on Detroit’s blue line to rush up to the play, and the Red Wings got it out of their own zone, leaving most of the Hurricanes behind. Tomas Holmstrom carried across the Hurricanes blue line and left the puck for Larionov, while Mathieu Dandenault headed for the front of the net. Dandenault created a perfect screen to block Irbe’s view, allowing Larionov to skate across the slot and backhand a high shot in to end the game.

Final shots on net added up to fifty-three to forty-three in Detroit’s favor. Game Four will play in Raleigh on Monday night, even though Game Three could had very nearly enough minutes to be two games.


Ron Francis set a record in Game One of this series, being then the oldest player to have ever scored a goal in overtime in a Stanley Cup Final game. Looks like Igor Larionov stole that record cleanly just two games later….. Speaking of being old, certain media personalities who should probably remain nameless have mentioned throughout the playoffs how the Red Wings’ advanced age would be a hindrance to them in overtimes and long series, because they are “so old” that they would tire easily. Hmmm. It appeared to this reporter that those young, strong Hurricanes were the ones wearing out as the game dragged on through the overtimes. So much for youth culture in the world of hockey.