Wings Resign McCarty, Woolley

As the 2003 free agent season approached, the Red Wings avoided allowing grinder Darren McCarty and defenseman Jason Woolley to hit the open market.

McCarty, who has played his entire career for Detroit, signed a four-year, $8.75 million deal late Monday.

“I’m happy,” said McCarty. “The most important thing to me was term. Maybe I could have gotten more on the open market, but I’m happy with what I’ve got.”

Woolley was signed to a two-year deal that is believed to be worth less than the $1.3 million per season he earned last year. The defenseman joined the Red Wings in December in a trade from the Buffalo Sabres. He played college hockey in East Lansing at Michigan State.

As the midnight deadline passed, Sergei Fedorov, Igor Larionov, Jesse Wallin, Patrick Boileau and Steve Yzerman became unrestricted free agents. Yzerman is the only one of the five not expected to test the market.


Defenseman Dmitri Bykov has decided to return to Russia to play for Ak Bars Kazan next season, rather than playing for the Red Wings.

Wings Pick Up Option on Hasek

The Detroit Red Wings have picked up their $8 million option on previously-retired goaltender Dominik Hasek for the 2003-2004 season.

The rumors about a possible return to the NHL by Hasek, who retired after helping the Red Wings claim the Stanley Cup in 2002, have circulated for several weeks. It was only a week ago that the Detroit organization finally revealed that they were in talks with Hasek about his comeback.

The Red Wings are now left with two $8 million goaltenders on the roster. They have been unable to trade Curtis Joseph, who signed with the Wings following Hasek’s retirement. Joseph’s contract, which runs through the 2004-2005 season, includes a no-trade clause that the Red Wings hope he will waive.

In addition to trading one of their netminders, the Red Wings must now attempt to resign star forward Sergei Fedorov, grinder Darren McCarty, and defensemen Jason Woolley and Dmitri Bykov.

Wings Come to Terms with Datsyuk

Detroit Red Wings general manager Ken Holland announced Thursday that the team had agreed upon a contract with restricted free agent Pavel Datsyuk. As per the team’s policy, terms of the deal were not announced.

Datsyuk had been offered a contract by his former team in Russia, Ak Bars Kazan, but he made it clear that he wanted to return to the Red Wings.

“We’re all very happy to have Pavel Back,” said Holland. “He is part of a group of young and talented players who are important to the balance and makeup of our team. He had an exceptional sophomore season and we look forward to his continued improvement in the future.”

The 25-year-old center scored twelve goals and added thirty-nine assists in sixty-four games with the Red Wings last season, his sophomore year. He finished fourth in voting for the Calder Memorial Trophy as rookie of the year the season before.

Ak Bars Kazan has already signed Red Wings defenseman Dmitri Bykov to a deal for next season. Detroit has until July 15 to sign Bykov or he will play in Russia next year.

Wings Defenseman Bykov Signs with Russian Team

Red Wings rookie defenseman Dmitri Bykov has signed with a Russian team in an attempt to gain leverage in negotiations with Detroit.

Bykov, a restricted free agent, can still sign with the Red Wings for next season. However, now Detroit must sign him before July 15, the deadline for NHL teams to sign players with overseas contracts, for him to be available for the 2003-2004 campaign.

“He’s told me that it’s viewed as an insurance policy,” Bykov’s agent Don Meehan said. “His heart is in Detroit. His every intention is to re-sign with Detroit.”

Bykov signed with Ak Bars Kazan, his former team.

Meehan’s partner, Pat Morris, told WDFN-AM that the deal was for $1 million tax-free across two seasons. It may be difficult for the Wings to match that offer. Bykov was paid $605,000 in his rookie campaign.

Bykov, 26, was the eighth-round pick of the Red Wings in the 2001 NHL Entry Draft. After immigration problems caused him to miss training camp in 2002, he joined the Red Wings and played well enough to make the roster for the year.

Early Summer This Year

The Game
Henrik Zetterberg scored the first goal of the game, his first-ever playoff goal, but Steve Rucchin scored the last goal of the game, and that, as it turned out, was the important one. The Mighty Ducks of Anaheim completed their quarterfinal sweep of the Red Wings with a 3-2 overtime win.

The Red Wings looked much better to start Game Four than they had looked previously in the series?not completely up to their potential yet, but certainly better. They were driving to the net and trying harder to put the puck high against Jean-Sebastien Giguere, and that extra effort led directly to Zetterberg’s goal late in the first period. Brett Hull stripped Petr Sykora of the puck in the high slot area of Anaheim’s zone. Hull pushed towards the net, and Zetterberg came with him on the right side. Hull made a quick pass across to his linemate, and Zetterberg lifted a quick wrist shot over Giguere.

Confusion on a call let the Ducks tie the game up just under two minutes later. Mathieu Dandenault knew he was about to get a penalty for high-sticking on a delayed call. He looked to have touched the puck, and the other Wings on the ice slowed in anticipation of the whistle, but that whistle didn’t come because Dandenault never actually had possession of the puck. Adam Oates took the puck away, brought it into the zone, and sent it across to Paul Kariya. Kariya had a clear shot on Curtis Joseph and was able to put the puck into the top corner.

The second period was scoreless, although both teams had their chances. The Grind Line brought havoc to the Ducks’ zone, creating multiple quality scoring chances. Rob Niedermayer was so frustrated by Joseph’s excellent saves during an Anaheim power play that he took an ill-advised cross-checking penalty, negating his team’s man-advantage and giving the Red Wings a shortened power play of their own.

Jason Krog scored early in the third period, and the Ducks promptly shut down. The Red Wings still managed to get through to the Ducks’ zone, but rarely were they able to get the screened shots or deflected shots which seemed to be the best way to defeat Giguere. Mathieu Schneider took an interference penalty with just 5:23 left in regulation, further thwarting the Wings’ chances.

Then, with 2:15 left to play, the Red Wings finally got a break. Sergei Fedorov eluded the Ducks who had been dogging his steps all series. He went into the right corner, one on one against Keith Carney, and won the battle for the puck. Fedorov threw it out in front of the net, and it hit the skate of Niclas Havelid. It bounced. It bounced right past Giguere and into the net.

Fedorov played like a man possessed for the rest of regulation time, seeking to win before overtime started, but Giguere regained control of himself and sent the game to the extra session.

At 6:53 of overtime, a little after 1:00 am in Detroit, a little after 10:00 pm in Anaheim, Rucchin scored his series-winning goal. Carney was allowed to take the puck behind the net. He centered it out front to Rucchin, coming up the high slot all alone. Rucchin one-timed the shot up and over Joseph for the win.

Now What?
There could be changes in Detroit this summer. Not drastic ones, surely. But there will be financial considerations, with no further playoff revenue coming to the team. Ticket prices may have to be raised for next year. It may be harder to keep free agents like Sergei Fedorov, Igor Larionov, Darren McCarty, Luc Robitaille, and Jason Woolley, and certainly it could be more difficult to lure free agents from other teams.

But these are matters for later. It’s time to rest now, time to carefully roll up the car flags and stow them in the trunk, time to fold the banners and set them gently in the closet for next year. Time to regroup and heal, time for our young rookies to become stronger and time for our veterans to rest their strength.

The 2002-2003 season is over. But Jiri Fischer will be fully healed by fall, and Pavel Datsyuk, Henrik Zetterberg, and Dmitri Bykov show much promise, along with a host of other young prospects who played in the minors or the European leagues this year. The team’s veteran core will remain intact, contributing and teaching. There’s always 2003-2004.

There’s always a next year for Hockeytown.

Tempting Fate

In spite of a late rally after Tomas Holmstrom finally cracked the armor of Jean-Sebastien Giguere, in spite of outshooting the Mighty Ducks once again, in spite of the huge amounts of ice time logged by Nicklas Lidstrom, Sergei Fedorov, and Steve Yzerman, the Ducks took a 2-1 win in their first home game and now lead the quarterfinal series 3-0.

The game started off well for the Red Wings. The Grind Line played well, with Darren McCarty, Kirk Maltby, and Kris Draper taking it in turns to post themselves in front of the net to screen Giguere and try to grab up stray rebounds or redirect shots on the way through. Curtis Joseph made two big saves early against Steve Rucchin. The Red Wings even got the first power play of the game late in the first. Brendan Shanahan had a good chance to score from his customary spot at the left faceoff circle. He had beaten Giguere, but the puck clanged off the crossbar.

A turnover at the blue line let the Ducks open the scoring early in the second period. Stanislav Chistov barely managed to drag the puck around Dmitri Bykov, but got the pass away to Samuel Pahlsson. Pahlsson took a quick shot which rattled into the net.

Mathieu Dandenault thought he had evened the game up with a long shot from the blue line just a minute later, but the play was whistled down because Detroit had had too many men on the ice. Shanahan and Steve Yzerman had a good chance to score shorthanded on the resulting penalty, but Shanahan’s shot was just low enough that Giguere could catch it in his glove.

The Red Wings certainly had their chances to score, but again Giguere played an excellent game, and his defensemen picked off most rebounds before Detroit could get to them.

The Ducks increased their lead early in the third period. Joseph came out of the net to clear the puck away, but his pass bounced off the leg of Chris Chelios and back to Chistov. Joseph scrambled to get back, and Henrik Zetterberg scrambled to help him cover the empty parts of the net, but Chistov put the puck off Zetterberg’s skate and into the net.

Pahlsson took a penalty for holding the stick of Luc Robitaille (and thus denying Robitaille a strong scoring chance) at 6:22, and the Red Wings finally got on the board within six seconds. Holmstrom went to the front of the net, got shoved around as usual, and was rewarded with the rebound from Lidstrom’s shot. He lifted the puck up and over Giguere, making it a one-shot game.

The Red Wings scrambled after that, trying to beat the solid goaltender one more time. They pulled Joseph from the net for an extra attacker with just over a minute left to play, but Giguere was able to control all his rebounds, and the Red Wings finally just ran out of time.

The count of shots on net was 37-26 favoring Detroit. The best-of-seven series will continue Wednesday night from Anaheim.

Wings & Jackets Battle To 5-5 Tie

The President’s Trophy may be out of reach now, but the top spot in the Western Conference is still within grasp. The one point the Red Wings gained in tonight’s 5-5 tie with the Columbus Blue Jackets ties Detroit with Dallas for first seed.

On paper and by the numbers, it looked as if the Red Wings should be able to romp right over the Blue Jackets. Yet Columbus consistently plays their very best games against Detroit, and tonight was certainly no exception.

David Vyborny opened the scoring for Columbus just 2:39 into the game. He was up ice on a three on two rush with Andrew Cassels and Geoff Sanderson. Sanderson sent the pass across, and Vyborny was able to lift it high into the net before Manny Legace could slide across to block the shot.

Cassels scored next for Columbus, midway through the period. He picked the puck away from Mathieu Dandenault at the Columbus blue line, then carried up through center. Cassels shot from the Red Wings’ blue line and the puck flew into the net.

Tyler Wright increased the Blue Jacket’s lead to three goals early in the second period. Rick Nash had three Red Wings covering him, but he managed to get the puck away to Vyborny, who gave it to Wright. Wright was all alone in front of the net and he was able to lift the puck high over Legace.

Kris Draper took away some of the Blue Jackets’ momentum. Darren McCarty made the pass crossing the blue line. Draper carried the puck up the right side and snapped a shot on net. The puck went off the far goalpost and in past Marc Denis.

The Red Wings got a power play shortly after that, on a holding call to Duvie Westcott. Sergei Fedorov shot the puck on net. Tomas Holmstrom scooped it away from Denis and tossed it over to the side of the crease, where Brendan Shanahan had plenty of empty space to slap the puck into the net.

Legace made a huge save on Vyborny on the very next shift to keep the Wings within one, and Denis answered with an equally huge save on Fedorov. Ray Whitney was the one to increase the Blue Jackets’ lead to 4-2. He carried the puck into the zone past Dmitri Bykov and took a hard shot which brushed the top of Legace’s blocker on its way through to the net.

Brett Hull brought the Red Wings back within one early in the third. Pavel Datsyuk made the pass from the slot area to the left boards, and Hull wristed the shot off both goalposts and into the net. The momentum swing was short-lived, unfortunately. Just a minute later, Lasse Pirjeta was able to get the rebound from a mad scramble in front of the Detroit net and slide it into the net beneath Legace’s ankle.

Kirk Maltby added a goal with 4:01 left to play, just aafter a Detroit power play had ended. He came over the boards, took the puck at center, and skated right through the standing Columbus skaters to backhand the puck past Denis.

The shots came in a flurry after that. With 1:22 remaining, Detroit called a timeout and pulled Legace out of the net to send in six skaters. The Blue Jackets thought that Vyborny scored into the empty net with 0:41 remaining, but the goal was waved off because the referee had been blowing his whistle to stop the play beforehand due to player injury. Shanahan had been hit in the mouth by the puck and had dropped to the ice.

The tying goal finally came with just 0:12 left to play. Fedorov passed the puck from the right corner to Hull along the opposite boards. Hull threw it out into the slot for Datsyuk, and Datysuk slapped it into the net past Denis.

Given the intense pace of the last few minutes of regulation, the overtime started quietly. Each team took only two shots on net in the extra five minutes. Maltby and Wright got into a scuffle in front of the Columbus net with just under a minute to play, but nothing came of it, and the game ended in a 5-5 tie.

Each team had 35 shots on net. Detroit was 1 for 5 on the power play; Columbus was 0 for 3. The Red Wings will close out the regular season on Sunday afternoon with a matchup against the Chicago Blackhawks.


Denis set a new record for minutes played in a season. He had 4451 at the end of this game, passing Martin Brodeur‘s record of 4439 set in the 1995-96 season…. Shanahan’s goal was his 30th of the season and the 533rd of his career, tying him with Frank Mahovlich for 22nd on the all-time goal scorers list…. Hull is now just one goal away from tying Phil Esposito for 4th place on the goal scorers list…. The Red Wings are now tied with the Stars with 109 points each. If the two teams are still tied for points after their final games on Sunday, the Red Wings will take first spot because they have the higher number of wins. The Ottawa Senators have 111 points, but they also have 51 wins to the Red Wings’ 48 and the Stars’ 45, so the Senators will be awarded the President’s Trophy.

Wings Dominate in Important, Emotional Win

If there are many more games like this one in St. Louis, the Savvis Center’s management may want to consider building an expansion for their penalty boxes. The Red Wings came up with a 6-2 win over the Blues, and the Blues were really letting their frustration show by the game’s end. By the final buzzer, there were a total of seventeen players between both teams who hadn’t been tossed out of the game. And the playoffs haven’t even started yet. Bring it on!

Emotions were running high early. The Blues were fired up at the return of Chris Pronger, who has been out of the lineup all season. However, his first impact on his team was to take a high-sticking penalty. The Blues’ penalty killers did a good job of not letting Detroit get set up on that one. Tyson Nash managed to generate a shorthanded scoring chance, but Manny Legace was sharp on the shot and the rebound.

Brett Hull opened the scoring midway through the period. Henrik Zetterberg carried the puck up the right side and passed it back across the crease once he gained the goal line. Hull was following the play, driving to the net with his stick on the ice, and he was in perfect position to lift the puck over Chris Osgood.

Pavel Datsyuk increased the lead a few minutes later. Pronger fanned on a slapshot attempt in the Detroit zone, and Datsyuk stole the puck to carry it up ice. Pronger and Bryce Salvador backed up to defend, but Datsyuk cut right between the two of them and stuffed the puck into the net underneath Osgood.

The Blues got themselves on the board with 3:29 left in the first. Steve Martins won a draw deep in the Red Wings’ end. The puck came back to Pronger, who wound up and took the shot. The puck tipped off a Detroit skater on the way through, and flew just past the end of Legace’s catching glove.

The second period was a story of penalty killing. Chris Chelios had taken a four minute high-sticking double minor penalty just at the end of the first period. Thirty seconds had gone by in that when the referees saw fit to send Kris Draper out for boarding. Kirk Maltby, Nicklas Lidstrom, and Mathieu Schneider played an excellent penalty kill, and Legace came up with a huge save on Pronger to stop the clock and allow Steve Yzerman and Brendan Shanahan to come over the boards to replace Schneider and Maltby. When play started again, Lidstrom cleared the puck, and that did it for the 5-on-3. The remainder of the Blues’ 5-on-4 was negated when Pronger took another penalty, this one for interference, but then the Red Wings’ resulting shortened power play was negated when the team was assessed a bench minor for having too many men on the ice.

The one call which probably should have been made in the second was not made at all. Tyson Nash was sticked in the mouth by Shanahan””Nash was falling at the time, so a stick at that height would ordinarily have hit a skater somewhere in the stomach, but the stick did draw blood, which would ordinarily be an automatic four minute penalty. None of the officials saw it, and the Blues apparently swore revenge.

Vengeance was not coming in the second period, however. Corey Stillman received an elbowing penalty shortly thereafter. Shanahan made the pass from behind the net to the high slot which allowed Lidstrom to pinch in from the blue line and wrist a shot through a screen of players over Osgood’s shoulder.

Nash, having had his lip stitched up neatly, was out on the ice to take a pass from Alexander Khavanov and fire it into the net from point blank range, bringing the Blues back within one goal with 7:38 left in the game. Just as the goal was called, Reed Low and Darren McCarty were handed coincidental minor penalties for diving and cross-checking respectively. Sergei Fedorov added a goal with a wrist shot just under the crossbar during the resulting four-on-four.

As soon as McCarty and Low were out of the box, they dropped the gloves and went at each other. Both were given five minute fighting majors, and McCarty was given a game misconduct for not having his jersey strap tied down””Low pulled it right off as soon as the fight started.

Scott Mellanby took an interference penalty with 5:11 left to play. Nash decided his goal wasn’t good enough revenge and attacked Shanahan directly. While those two fought, Fedorov tangled with Barret Jackman. Once the officials cleared the ice, Hull scored a power play goal. Datsyuk made a pass from behind the net to Schneider. Hull picked up the rebound from Schneider’s shot and put it into the empty corner of the net.

Hull’s third goal of the night barely two minutes later””set up by amazing passing from Zetterberg and Datsyuk, of course””opened the floodgates to chaos. Mellanby, Jackman, Dallas Drake, Ryan Johnson, Maltby, Draper, and Dmitri Bykov were all thrown out of the game. The very next shift, it started up again. Matt Walker tried to pick a fight with Tomas Holmstrom, who was skating away from it, but Luc Robitaille came in to defend his linemate. From the resulting battle, Walker, Salvador, Shjon Podein, Doug Weight, Holmstrom, Robitaille, Schneider, and Mathieu Dandenault were sent out. The Detroit bench took a penalty when assistant coach Joey Kocur threw a chair onto the ice in frustration at the way the Blues had simply decided to run at his players, and he and St. Louis coach Joel Quenneville screamed obscenities at each other until calmer heads prevailed, the linesman dropped the puck, and the few remaining players let the clock run down.

The count of shots on net was 24 to 21 in favor of the Blues. The total number of penalty minutes, for those who count such things, was 114 for Detroit and 129 for St. Louis. The Red Wings’ next game will be Monday night at the Joe against the Nashville Predators.

Spring Comes To Hockeytown

Sure, there are still patches of snow and ice on the ground, and sure, the fans walking from the parking garage to Joe Louis Arena had leftover salt crunching beneath their feet. But it was 50 degrees and sunny, the red and white jerseys were visible instead of hidden under heavy coats, the Captain was in the lineup, and there are now only eleven (that’s ELEVEN) games left before the playoffs! Better yet, the Colorado Avalanche left Hockeytown Saturday afternoon with a 5-3 loss added to their record.

The scoring was opened early in the game by Pavel Datsyuk. Henrik Zetterberg made a tight pass to his linemate, and Datsyuk flipped it into the net past Patrick Roy.

The Avalanche struck twice before the first period was over to take a 2-1 lead into the locker room for the first intermission. The first goal came shorthanded, as Greg DeVries sprung Steven Reinprecht on a breakaway. Reinprecht went in all alone on Curtis Joseph and fooled the Detroit goalie with a move to the right before putting the puck in high.

Rob Blake‘s goal came on a power play. He took a pass from Joe Sakic, then shot from the blue line. Joseph was screened and never saw the puck on its way through.

The second period started with an entirely different feeling to it. Detroit was completely dominant, and Colorado didn’t have much of a chance. The Wings outshot the Avalanche 15 to 4 in the second twenty minutes of play. Roy stopped 12 of the shots, but the shots from Brendan Shanahan, Sergei Fedorov, and Igor Larionov were too much for him to handle.

“Paaaaaaaa-triiiiiiiiiiick! Paaaaaaaa-triiiiiiiiiiick!” taunted the fans at the Joe, as Shanahan stuffed a pass by Fedorov into the net, as Fedorov scored on a feed by Steve Yzerman, and as Larionov turned a pass by Luc Robitaille into the eventual game-winning goal. “Paaaaaaaa-triiiiiiiiiiick!”

Brett Hull didn’t want to be left out of the fun. He scored his 30th goal of the season, the 709th of his career, on an excellent give-and-go passing play with Datsyuk early in the third period. Datsyuk rushed up left and passed to Hull on the right. Hull passed it back to Datsyuk. Roy slid to his right, thinking that Hull’s angle to the net negated him as a threat. Datsyuk passed back anyway, and Hull scored into the empty side of the net at such a tight angle that he couldn’t have had a space any wider than the puck itself to shoot at.

Even Roy was impressed by the goal. “Let’s give them credit for that play,” he said. “He made a great pass to (Datsyuk) and he made a super pass back to (Hull), and he tapped it in. That’s one we’ll see the highlights of a lot.” Hull, characteristically, seemed prouder of his young linemate than of his own accomplishment. “That’s the way you’re supposed to play,” he beamed. “Pass the puck, and get it back.”

Derek Morris did score a power play goal for Colorado before the game was over. The Red Wings played a passing game of “keep-away” with the puck as the game wound down, causing the Avalanche to have to keep Roy in goal instead of pulling him for an extra skater. They did finally get puck control and pull their goalie out in the final minute, but Joseph was ready with some excellent saves to keep the win and tie the regular-season-series between these two teams at 2-2.

The final count of shots on net was 38-24 in favor of Detroit. The Red Wings’ next opponent is the Eastern Conference-leading Ottawa Senators. The teams will square off Sunday night at Joe Louis Arena.


Hull’s goal propelled him past Mike Gartner into sole possession of the fifth place on the all-time goal scorers list…. Peter Forsberg left the game with a bruised leg after a collision with Dmitri Bykov at center ice. Bykov was uninjured.

Wings Deny 3rd Period Rally By Kings

The Los Angeles Kings tried their best to make a comeback, but their best wasn’t good enough to beat Manny Legace. Legace made 14 saves in the third period and 27 saves over all to help the Red Wings hold onto a 3-2 win over the Kings.

The first period started off slowly for both teams. Detroit and Los Angeles both seemed willing to play a more defensive style, protect their goaltenders, and wait for the other team to give up a scoring chance.

Kris Draper put the Red Wings on the scoreboard with his 12th goal of the season late in the period. Darren McCarty tied up the puck in the corner and held off the two Los Angeles players trying to dig it loose until he could slide it out to Kirk Maltby. Maltby set up the pass for Draper, and Draper took a one-time shot which flew into the net over the shoulder of goaltender Jamie Storr.

The Red Wings got a power play chance early in the second period, and it only took 10 seconds for the NHL’s top-ranked power play unit to score a goal. Brendan Shanahan took the blue line pass from Igor Larionov at the left point. Shanahan shot the puck on net. Storr made the save, but Tomas Holmstrom was right in front scrambling for the rebound and distracting the goalie. Meanwhile, Nicklas Lidstrom had come in close to the net, since Shanahan had taken over his normal spot at the left point. The puck slid free to Lidstrom, and he was able to backhand the shot in past Storr.

Henrik Zetterberg increased Detroit’s lead midway through the period. Pavel Datsyuk got the puck out of the corner and banked a centering pass off of a Los Angeles player’s skate. Zetterberg took the pass in front of the crease and lifted a backhand shot which bounced off of Storr’s helmet and into the net.

The Kings’ bench decided to pull Storr out of the game at that point to send in rookie goaltender Cristobal Huet, hoping that it would enliven the team. The Kings did tighten up and play better defense to protect their young goaltender, but the offense didn’t really come alive until 2:50 into the third period. Mathieu Schneider managed to put a hard shot past Legace’s glove, and the Kings suddenly seemed to realize they weren’t out of the game after all.

Legace was forced to make many excellent saves through the third period to hold off the renewed onslaught by Los Angeles. Zigmund Palffy got a breakaway goal past Legace, but Legace denied Palffy the tying goal with an acrobatic leg pad save just a few moments later. The Kings pulled Huet out of the net for the extra attacker in the last minute of play. The Red Wings sent them back to the other end of the rink. The Kings brought the puck back into the Detroit zone in the dying seconds of the game, and Legace made one last save on a hard shot from the right faceoff circle just as the final buzzer sounded.

In the final count, Los Angeles outshot Detroit by a count of 29-18. A full 16 of the Kings’ shots came in the third period. The Red Wings will finish up their road trip with a game against the Phoenix Coyotes on Wednesday night.


Steve Yzerman was back in the lineup for this game. He led all forwards in ice time, playing 20:32, and spent time on both the penalty killing and power play units…. Dmitri Bykov also returned to the lineup after missing two games because of an eye injury sustained in the March 5 game against Tampa Bay.